Vue tailwind

Tailwind is a CSS framework which allows you rapidly build custom user interfaces. It has no theme or components, but instead allow you to construct your own components by combining a bunch of CSS utilities. For more information on Tailwind you can look at the documentation. In this blog post I am going to look at how to use Tailwind in a Vue application, so I will assume you already have some sort of familiarity with both Tailwind and Vue and that you have the Vue CLI installed.

Once you have created the application, you can change to tailwind-test directory containing the application and do an npm install :. For this blog post I will leave the Tailwind configuration file as-is, but you can refer to the Configuration documentation for more information on the contents of this file. Next up we will need to create a CSS file. The contents for the file above was taken from the Tailwind Installation documentation. The final piece of the puzzle is to update the.

Update this file as follows:. At this point we have configured Tailwind and we can start using it. Head over to your App. This is what my App.

vue tailwind

I will use the 3D Button sample from the Tailwind website. I updated the HelloWorld. Note the use of the Tailwind classes on the button element, as well as the use of the mb-4 class on the h1 element to add a bit of bottom margin to the heading. One of the nice things about Tailwind is that it allows you to extract components. As an example I may want to extract a btn-blue class in order to use that same styling for other buttons in my application.

Note that I removed all those comments from before from the main. And now we can use the btn-blue style in our application.

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When we run the application, you can see the two button using the btn-blue class:. Using Tailwind utilities inside a Vue component is possible, but definitely not advisable. You can read more about it on this GitHub issue. The Tailwind team was considering a way around this but at this time have decided not to implement it yet.

NET Core projects, I am available for hire for freelance work. December 13, NET Core 2. Next Using Tailwind with Angular.Some information might be out of date, as I don't always update older articles. Today Adam released 0.

Vue-Tailwind-Components

The tailwind utilities directive no longer has to be added into every Vue component, but you can still use the apply directive in your components to write your CSS classes. I've changed the repository mentioned in the article with this pull request. I've also striked through and edited some of the text parts, which are no longer important. One part of my day job is to write JavaScript widgets.

Our customers can place widgets in their websites to allow their users to signup for certain services. We've decided to use Vue as we've used it on a smaller scale in other parts of our projects and were very happy with it. One issue we've always faced over the years is scoping and namespacing CSS. Of course we could use! This solved some of the CSS collision problems but it was quite cumbersome to use the prefix in the code.

While evaluating our next tech stack I discovered "scoped CSS". Right there in the documentation I discovered CSS modules and started reading a lot more about it. The widgets we create are actually very powerful, applications. CSS Modules is best described in this quote:. During your build process CSS Modules will parse it, convert it into a JavaScript object and change the class name to a random string.

Depending on your configuration the final rendered HTML will look like this. By replacing the. If a parent site also implements a. For example if you have a color. If you use. If we take our. I've used other utility based CSS frameworks before, like Tachyons or BassCSSbut none of the them provided a great toolset to move your utility classes to components.

Most CSS frameworks do too much.

Tailwind is built with PostCSS and comes with a handy apply directive to build components out of utility classes. What I especially like about Tailwind is its configuration file. In it you define your colors, spacing levels and font weights.

I think it's a great way to keep the CSS of a project maintainable by just using the apply directive and the colors defined in your configuration file. No longer you have to remember which HEX-colors is your primary one or use different magic numbers for your paddings and margins.

You just use apply text-primary and your good to go.

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If you want to know more about utility based CSS frameworks I highly recommend reading Adam Wathans article about that topic. So how do we get all the parts together? Let's create a very simple Vue application. As I often work with Laravel and I would like to keep this post a short as possible, I will use Laravel Mix to keep my webpack configuration simple.

You can see the following changes also in this pull request on GitHub. This will allow us to create a dev build npm run deva production build npm run prod and watch for changes npm run watch.Tailwind CSS is a highly customizable, low-level CSS framework that gives you all of the building blocks you need to build bespoke designs without any annoying opinionated styles you have to fight to override.

They come with all sorts of predesigned components like buttons, cards, and alerts that might help you move quickly at first, but cause more pain than they cure when it comes time to make your site stand out with a custom design. Instead of opinionated predesigned components, Tailwind provides low-level utility classes that let you build completely custom designs without ever leaving your HTML.

Getting a new business off the ground is a lot of hard work. Here are five ideas you can use to find your first customers. If you're sick of fighting the framework, overriding unwanted styles, and battling specificity wars, Tailwind was made for you. Every Tailwind utility also comes with responsive variants, making it extremely easy to build responsive interfaces without resorting to custom CSS.

While you can do a lot with just utility classes, as a project grows it can be useful to codify common patterns into higher level abstractions. Tailwind provides tools for extracting component classes from repeated utility patterns, making it easy to update multiple instances of a component from one place:.

If it makes sense to be customizable, Tailwind lets you customize it.

vue tailwind

This includes colors, border sizes, font weights, spacing utilities, breakpoints, shadows, and tons more. Tailwind is written in PostCSS and configured in JavaScript, which means you have the full power of a real programming language at your fingertips.

Tailwind UI is now in early access!

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Now in early access! GitHub Twitter Discord. A utility-first CSS framework for rapidly building custom designs. Get Started Why Tailwind? Documentation Components Screencasts Resources Community. Base styles Preflight. Spacing Padding Margin. Tables Border Collapse Table Layout. Effects Box Shadow Opacity.

Accessibility Screen Readers. Most CSS frameworks do too much. Utility-first They come with all sorts of predesigned components like buttons, cards, and alerts that might help you move quickly at first, but cause more pain than they cure when it comes time to make your site stand out with a custom design.So in my next two articles, we take a closer look at this utility-first CSS framework.

Because Tailwind CSS is a utility-first CSS framework which provides a lot of utility classes out of the box, its file size without any optimizations is pretty massive But luckily, we can use PurgeCSS to improve the final bundle size of our application tremendously.

This is the first part of a short excursion into the world of utility-first CSS frameworks. In the second part, we find out how to build highly maintainable applications with Tailwind CSS and Vue. Follow this link to read the second part about how to build reusable functional Vue. If you want to take a look at the final code, you can check out the full code on GitHub.

But if you use the Vue CLI, you can also use vue-cli-plugin-tailwind to get up and running even faster. After installing tailwindcss as a dependency of our project and adding it to the list of PostCSS plugins inside of our postcss.

First, we create a new index. Next, we import this newly created file inside of our main main. If we want to change certain aspects of our Tailwind CSS setup, we can create a configuration file. This makes it possible to change things like the font family, colors, margins, and even the media query breakpoints, for example. This creates a new file, tailwind. We can use this configuration file to adapt Tailwind CSS to our needs.

Now we have everything set up to start building Tailwind powered applications. But if we take a closer look at the final bundle size of our app, we notice that Tailwind adds a considerable large chunk of CSS. After installing the postcss-purgecss plugin, we must add it to our postcss. First, we add the.

Next, we change the defaultExtractor to work with Tailwind. As you can see above, we only add the purgecss plugin in production mode. This makes development faster but also comes with the downside that we might not be aware of the fact that PurgeCSS removes certain CSS styles because we did not write our CSS classes correctly inside of our components.

Register for the Newsletter of my upcoming book: Advanced Vue. In the example headline component above, we use template-strings to programmatically set the tag rendered for the component and the text size class. This is problematic when using PurgeCSS. Because that way, it does not know that the styles for the h tags and the text-1xltext-2xl… classes are necessary and must not be purged.

Unfortunately, this approach is a lot more verbose than the initial solution, but this is one of the tradeoffs we have to take when using PurgeCSS. But this was only the beginning: now you are ready to read the next article about how to build reusable functional components with Tailwind CSS and Vue.

Do you want to learn more about advanced Vue. Like what you read?Let's take our expriements installing Tailwind CSS and building a nav with it to the next level. Today, we're going to be building a simple todo app with Vue. For the sake of time, we're not going to persist any data. But fear not, that will certainly make an excellent part two. For this simple project, let's just use the default welcome.

We'll need to configure this template so our Vue code can hook in and work correctly. To start, add in the following meta tag to our head right below the other meta tags. Now, we can delete the default styles and font import and move onto the body. Inside our body tag, we can see a bunch of generated code.

Go ahead and replace it with the following:.

vue tailwind

As you can see, the example component is rendering correctly and we're good to go. If you feel like you've missed something along the way, feel free to check out the GitHub repo for this project and follow along with my commits.

Now to set up Tailwind, I'm going to assume that you've worked through my earlier article that explains how to set up Tailwind in a Laravel project. After we've done all that, let's add one more line to our welcome. Let's start our Vue development by taking out the scaffolding and adding our own components.

In our welcome. To see this in the browser, we'll need to run our Laravel Mix. If you're following along, I recommend using npm run watch so your code changes automatically get compiled.

We're going to try and keep this Vue component pretty simple, so we can focus on styling it with Tailwind.

vue tailwind

For our template, let's use something that looks like this:. As you can see, this is a pretty simple component. We have a wrapper div like all Vue components, and then two child div s.

In the first one we have our header, which includes our new todo input. We've bound that input to a v-model called newTodo and we've added a method to our button called add to submit a new todo.That sounds like an excellent component to build, so let's get to it. Per usual, we'll be starting with a regular Laravel project.

I've covered this process in a previous postbut for a quick recap here are the steps. With our usual configuration out of the way, we can layer on the custom details we need for this project.

Since we'll want to trigger our modal from anywhere in our code, we need to set up a Vue event bus. This is super simple. We just hop into our app. Now, we can use our event bus to communicate between components. If you're looking for some more information about what a event bus does, you can always check out the Vue docs. But, I think it'll start to make more sense when we use it. With that set up, we can get rid of the example component if you haven't already and add in our modal component.

Lastly, we're going to use some "advanced" JavaScript in this tutorial. But, no need to worry, we'll walk through it step-by-step. So, in the same directory as modal. To see this all running in the browser, we'll need to run our Laravel Mix. If you're following along, I recommend using npm run watch so your code changes automatically get compiled. With our Vue component ready, let's add a custom color that we'll end up needing for our modal background overlay to our Tailwind config.

Can you believe that we've already made it through 3 other Tailwind tutorials on this blog before we had to edit the default settings? While the default settings have gotten us this far, we need to add a color to make sure our modal background has an opacity. To add this color, we can hop into our tailwind. Here we can see all sorts of options, but we just need to focus on the color variable.

Inside this object, we can add this: 'transparent-black': 'rgba 0,0,0. Now, we need to make sure we run our Laravel Mix so this new color gets added to our Tailwind code. After you run that, you'll be able to reference this color like you have any other Tailwind color. How cool is that? With all of our set up out of the way, we're finally ready to start building this modal. Let's get the "hard" stuff out of the way first by opening up our modal. To start, let's think about what we'll want our modal to do.

We'll obviously need to be able to show and dismiss it when needed. The header and body text should probably be customizable as well. Plus, it would be great if we could tell it what type of modal to be, like a succesful modal or an error one.

Using Tailwind with Vue

With that in mind, we can come up with a JavaScript class that'll be a representation of what our modal should be. Now, you might be asking yourself, "why don't we just do all of this in our Vue component and be done? You could skip all of this entirely and just worry about passing events to your Vue component.Let's take our expriements installing Tailwind CSS and building a nav with it to the next level.

Today, we're going to be building a simple todo app with Vue. For the sake of time, we're not going to persist any data.

Building Workcation with Tailwind CSS (Part 1)

But fear not, that will certainly make an excellent part two. For this simple project, let's just use the default welcome. We'll need to configure this template so our Vue code can hook in and work correctly. To start, add in the following meta tag to our head right below the other meta tags. Now, we can delete the default styles and font import and move onto the body.

Inside our body tag, we can see a bunch of generated code. Go ahead and replace it with the following:. As you can see, the example component is rendering correctly and we're good to go. If you feel like you've missed something along the way, feel free to check out the GitHub repo for this project and follow along with my commits.

Now to set up Tailwind, I'm going to assume that you've worked through my earlier article that explains how to set up Tailwind in a Laravel project. After we've done all that, let's add one more line to our welcome. Let's start our Vue development by taking out the scaffolding and adding our own components.

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In our welcome. To see this in the browser, we'll need to run our Laravel Mix. If you're following along, I recommend using npm run watch so your code changes automatically get compiled. We're going to try and keep this Vue component pretty simple, so we can focus on styling it with Tailwind.

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For our template, let's use something that looks like this:. As you can see, this is a pretty simple component. We have a wrapper div like all Vue components, and then two child div s. In the first one we have our header, which includes our new todo input. We've bound that input to a v-model called newTodo and we've added a method to our button called add to submit a new todo. We're also disabling the button when there's no text in the input so we don't add empty todos.

In our bottom divwe're looping through each of the todos that we've added and we're displaying it's text data as well as two buttons. The first button let's us mark a todo as finished or not finished, while our second button removes the todo altogether. Pretty straightforward, right?

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Here we have the data that we're using to manage our todos and the three methods that we saw were bound to our template.


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